GollanczFest 2017 part 5

This continues on from my first post about the Gollancz Festival 2017.

The panel was called: Where Do You Get Your Ideas? Art, Music, Mythology & Magic: The Inspirations Behind It All. An intriguing but also simplistic query, after all writers can draw inspiration from anywhere, and I’ve often heard the expression: ideas are cheap. Personally I don’t quite agree with that expression, granted simple ideas/hooks are easy to think of, but great ideas are rare. On the surface it’s a simple question and whilst many people would likely give predictably simple answers, professional authors can have intriguing insights.

The panel was moderated by Gillian Redfearn (Publishing Director) and featured: Bradley Beaulieu, Tom Lloyd, Suzanne McLeod, Mark Barrowcliffe and Tom Toner. What occurred was an amusing back and forth, and whilst all of the authors were interesting and witty, Tom Toner had me struggling to restrain my laughing. I present a summary of comments, several of which I had forgotten who’d said them, but at least checking Twitter partly helped.

Gillian asked where the authors find inspiration, what it means to get ideas and write genre fiction. Later she asked: what’s the worst thing your character has ever done to you?

Bradley Beaulieu highlighted that plotting can only go so far before needing to get into the story. He gets endless inspiration from the entire story, especially smaller characters and the world/setting itself. Bradley provided the all-important writing reminder and an important reality regarding the muse: it all comes down to writing, and sometimes the muse hasn’t turned up, yet a writer still needs to write.

Mark Barrowcliffe discussed how inspiration doesn’t always come from the writer. Sometimes it comes from the writer’s take on other people’s ideas. An example is made regarding how common knowledge about things can change, consider that werewolves weren’t actually affected by the full moon in lore, it was invented by Hollywood in the 20th century.

Tom Lloyd said he gets his inspiration from thinking on the tube, mainly because he doesn’t want to make eye contact with strangers. He also explained how a good story sparks off other ideas, the bad ones will start to fizzle out.

Suzanne McLeod described how things come into your story out of your subconscious. New characters that aren’t planned can be the best, and a lot of fun can be had with them.

Tom Toner took a different tact with his answers, such as inspiration: “2 cups of coffee, stand in the shower… f**ktons of ideas!” Later Tom touched on his mascara fetish. As for characters: “God I hate writing characters, they’re so needy” and “I just wanna describe cool planets and cool stuff and monsters on the planet…characters get in the way.” Tom did expand on his replies.

Other comments of note were about how characters take over books, and how writing into the gaps of a story can reveal new things, to go exploring. Overall I thought the panel did a good job of discussing a difficult subject to provide depth on, especially without resorting to listing of things like: I read history and <insert Country> mythology, or I adore <book series>.

So ended the morning session. Next for me was a chat with Mark Stay and lunch.

A bit more progress on NaNoWriMo for me in the last few days, sadly not as much I’d like but when health dictates work rate, it’s best to not fight it #HealthyWriting. I’m still on target for the Gingerbread competition deadline, but I appreciate it’s important not to assume it’s guaranteed.

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